Browse Resources

Successful collaboration requires a facilitative leader. Facilitative leadership, if executed well, can increase effectiveness by harnessing the resources of many, can increase efficiency by avoiding duplication and conflict, and can be a powerful leveraging mechanism to achieve high level development goals.
Community Contribution
This document, an ADS 201 Additional Help resource, provides direction on how to develop a Collaborating, Learning and Adapting (CLA) plan for a Mission's Performance Monitoring Plan (PMP).It outlines the information to include in a CLA plan, describes the processes Missions can use to understand their current CLA...
USAID Contribution
This resource describes how to prepare and maintain an Activity Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning Plan.
USAID Contribution
This USAID Program Cycle Technical Note describes the 5Rs Framework and demonstrates how it can be applied to strengthen local systems and promote sustainability.
USAID Contribution
This document provides recommendations regarding the participation of USAID staff on external evaluations. It is for use primarily by USAID staff.
USAID Contribution
Recently, the DRG Center presented the findings from six DRG Integration Case Studies (Ethiopia, Indonesia, Rwanda, Guatemala, Malawi and Nepal) to 50 representatives of key USAID offices, universities, and implementing partners. Now we present our Synthesis Report, which gathers all of the evidence and synthesizes lessons for the entire agency. Also included are Tip Sheets for Integrating DRG in the Field and Two-Pagers on each of the six Case Studies.
Community Contribution
This Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) seeks opportunities to co-create, co-design, coinvest, and collaborate in the development, testing, and scaling of practical and cost-effective innovations that can help healthcare workers on the front lines provide better care and stop the spread of Ebola. The United States Agency...
USAID Contribution
This paper provides an overview of the facilitation approach with information drawn from its use in market systems development.
USAID Contribution
Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution
This Note provides guidance on the use of focus group interviews within evaluations.
USAID Contribution

Pages