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Successful collaboration requires a facilitative leader. Facilitative leadership, if executed well, can increase effectiveness by harnessing the resources of many, can increase efficiency by avoiding duplication and conflict, and can be a powerful leveraging mechanism to achieve high level development goals.
Community Contribution
This document, an ADS 201 Additional Help resource, provides direction on how to develop a Collaborating, Learning and Adapting (CLA) plan for a Mission's Performance Monitoring Plan (PMP).It outlines the information to include in a CLA plan, describes the processes Missions can use to understand their current CLA...
USAID Contribution
Collaborating, Learning and Adapting Framework and Maturity Tool documents
USAID Contribution
The Open Contracting Partnership is driven by two goals, as articulated in its 2015-2018 strategy: building global norms and demand for open contracting; and strengthening implementation of open contracting on the ground. The pursuit of both goals hinges on learning and evidence.While the strategy describes these...
Community Contribution
This paper provides an overview of the facilitation approach with information drawn from its use in market systems development.
USAID Contribution
Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution
Despite well-meaning cooperative behaviors, often interdepartmental collaboration breaks down.
Community Contribution
Modern communities of practice (CoP) built on a foundation of technology and social media are emerging on a global scale. Considering the speed at which technology evolves, best practices also continue to evolve for building, maintaining and measuring the effectiveness of these modern communities. This report attempts to outline and discuss key lessons learned to date and provide several recommendations based upon available evidence and expert opinion. But each CoP – defined here as a group of professionals with similar interests – is unique in purpose and must find its own path to success.
Community Contribution
Peer assists are face-to-face or virtual gatherings that bring colleagues together to share knowledge, best practices, or lessons learned on a particular topic. They can be an extremely useful learning activity to facilitate knowledge sharing, participatory learning, and collective problem solving. This document provides further information on the types of peer assists, assumptions and responsibilities, processes, lessons learned and resources.
USAID Contribution
This guidance brief provides information on requirements for webinar production, how-tos, lessons learned, and resources.
USAID Contribution

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