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This book captures the experiences and voices of over 6,000 people who have received international assistance, observed the effects of aid efforts, or been involved in providing aid. Over time, across very different contexts and continents, people’s experiences with international aid efforts have been remarkably...
Community Contribution
Review of political economy at national level in Kosovo and implications
Community Contribution
PEA of drivers of competitiveness in Serbian value chains
Community Contribution
Between September-November 2017, J.E. Austin Associates, Inc. (JAA) deployed a three-person team to undertake a political economy analysis (PEA) of the coffee, soybean, and dried bean value chains in South Kivu, with a focus on the Territoires of Kabare, Kalehe, and Walungu. This report summarizes the key findings,...
Community Contribution
The term D-MERL refers to the often disjointed components of the program-cycle and discrete and/or overlapping activities in program design (D), monitoring (M), evaluation (E), research (R), or learning (L). The BalanceD-MERL consortium posits that the incorporation of four key principles (relevant, right-sized,...
Community Contribution
The Gender Integration in E3 Evaluations report provides examples of gender integration and sector-specific gender results, drawing upon evaluations focusing on all E3 technical sectors
Community Contribution
This paper provides an overview of the facilitation approach with information drawn from its use in market systems development.
USAID Contribution
this new innovative methodology is being employed to evaluate program interventions, using case examples from USAID, the German Development Bank, and the World Bank.
USAID Contribution
Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution
Quantitative Tools and Methods
USAID Contribution

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