Browse Resources

Recent DRG Impact Evaluation reports examine:(1) USAID's Ghana Strengthening Accountability Mechanisms (GSAM) project: An impact evaluation of USAID's GSAM project, which aims to increase accountability of local District Assemblies in Ghana, tested the effect of two distinct efforts to increase accountability and...
Community Contribution
This publication organizes and evaluates the body of current academic theory that can contribute to greater understanding of democratic openings in authoritarian systems. The authors explore why and how these openings may occur, recognizing that most cases of subtle change away from authoritarianism do not necessarily...
Community Contribution
The term D-MERL refers to the often disjointed components of the program-cycle and discrete and/or overlapping activities in program design (D), monitoring (M), evaluation (E), research (R), or learning (L). The BalanceD-MERL consortium posits that the incorporation of four key principles (relevant, right-sized,...
Community Contribution
The Gender Integration in E3 Evaluations report provides examples of gender integration and sector-specific gender results, drawing upon evaluations focusing on all E3 technical sectors
Community Contribution
This Zimbabwe Transition Country Development Cooperation Strategy outlines the focus of USAID’s program in Zimbabwe to help support the transition to a democratic, peaceful, productive, multi-racial society; take care of its citizens; abide by the rule of law; respect human rights; and contribute to regional...
USAID Contribution
This paper provides an overview of the facilitation approach with information drawn from its use in market systems development.
USAID Contribution
this new innovative methodology is being employed to evaluate program interventions, using case examples from USAID, the German Development Bank, and the World Bank.
USAID Contribution
Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution
Quantitative Tools and Methods
USAID Contribution
ADB Knowledge Management Initiatives in 2013
Community Contribution

Pages