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 Evaluation syntheses are analytic reviews of evaluations that aggregate findings from evaluation reports and/or examine the quality of the evaluations reviewed. This Discussion Note, Making Evidence Accessible through Evaluation Synthesis, focuses on two common types of evaluation syntheses that USAID...
USAID Contribution
This Discussion Note outlines key considerations for USAID staff and evaluators when deciding to conduct an ex-post evaluation and then planning for, designing, implementing, and using findings from ex-post evaluations. Those commissioning an ex-post evaluation should consult with an evaluation specialist and consider...
USAID Contribution
This Note defines impact evaluations, explains when they should be commissioned according to USAID policy and describes different designs for quasi-experimental and experimental impact evaluations.
USAID Contribution
A four step tool for managing the systematic transfer organizational knowledge
Community Contribution
This checklist is intended for use by USAID and implementing partner staff when developing or reviewing learning questions during monitoring, evaluation, and learning (MEL) planning processes. It can be used to assess the appropriateness of each learning question based on utility, focus, feasibility, and inclusivity....
Community Contribution
There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that people struggle to actually use data and evidence to inform their decisions. While there are a number of reasons for this, one of the main reasons is that teams and organizations often fail to internalize the data and evidence they have. If people don’t interpret or...
Community Contribution
The new FAA 118/119 Tropical Forest and Biodiversity Analysis Best Practices Guide provides practical "how-to" advice for USAID staff and contractors conducting the analysis.
Community Contribution
Recently, the DRG Center presented the findings from six DRG Integration Case Studies (Ethiopia, Indonesia, Rwanda, Guatemala, Malawi and Nepal) to 50 representatives of key USAID offices, universities, and implementing partners. Now we present our Synthesis Report, which gathers all of the evidence and synthesizes lessons for the entire agency. Also included are Tip Sheets for Integrating DRG in the Field and Two-Pagers on each of the six Case Studies.
Community Contribution
Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution

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