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Techniques for achieving results and tracking progress in the fluid and rapidly changing operating environment of authoritarian-ruled Belarus.
Community Contribution
There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that people struggle to actually use data and evidence to inform their decisions. While there are a number of reasons for this, one of the main reasons is that teams and organizations often fail to internalize the data and evidence they have. If people don’t interpret or...
Community Contribution
Six Simple Questions to Help Identify Your Monitoring and/or Evaluation Need
USAID Contribution
This document, an ADS 201 Additional Help resource, provides direction on how to develop a Collaborating, Learning and Adapting (CLA) plan for a Mission's Performance Monitoring Plan (PMP).It outlines the information to include in a CLA plan, describes the processes Missions can use to understand their current CLA...
USAID Contribution
Collaborating, Learning and Adapting Framework and Maturity Tool documents
USAID Contribution
USAID is committed to full and active disclosure of evaluation reports, methods, findings, and data produced by the Agency or partners receiving USAID funding. This is guided by Agency policies and directives, including the USAID ADS Reference 201mae and ADS 540 – Development Experience Information. These direct that...
USAID Contribution
The Open Contracting Partnership is driven by two goals, as articulated in its 2015-2018 strategy: building global norms and demand for open contracting; and strengthening implementation of open contracting on the ground. The pursuit of both goals hinges on learning and evidence.While the strategy describes these...
Community Contribution
this new innovative methodology is being employed to evaluate program interventions, using case examples from USAID, the German Development Bank, and the World Bank.
USAID Contribution
Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution
Community Scorecard Template
Community Contribution

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