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A four step tool for managing the systematic transfer organizational knowledge
Community Contribution
There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that people struggle to actually use data and evidence to inform their decisions. While there are a number of reasons for this, one of the main reasons is that teams and organizations often fail to internalize the data and evidence they have. If people don’t interpret or...
Community Contribution
USAID has a long history of support for biodiversity conservation, including programs that help park authorities and rural communities reduce poaching and consumption of wildlife, usually as part of broader investments in protected area management or community-based natural resource management. Wildlife trafficking,...
Community Contribution
An intentional and collaborative strategy for continuous learning through all stages of the Program Cycle is essential to achieve development results. As a strategy for continuous learning, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)’s Bureau for Economic Growth, Education, and Environment/Office of...
Community Contribution
The new FAA 118/119 Tropical Forest and Biodiversity Analysis Best Practices Guide provides practical "how-to" advice for USAID staff and contractors conducting the analysis.
Community Contribution
A learning agenda includes a (1) set of questions addressing the critical knowledge gaps impeding informed design and implementation decisions and (2) plans for learning activities to help answer those questions. A basic process for a learning agenda includes three key steps:Understanding the context Developing and...
Community Contribution
What is a Learning Agenda?According to the Office of Management and Budget, a learning agenda is a set of broad questions directly related to the work that an agency conducts that, when answered, enables the agency to work more effectively and efficiently, particularly pertaining to evaluation, evidence, and...
Community Contribution
Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution
Learning from experiences to improve future actions has been a priority of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) for decades. Indeed, a number of approaches to learning and knowledge management have already been tried in the Agency through general and sector specific initiatives, with...
USAID Contribution

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