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Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution
Quantitative Tools and Methods
USAID Contribution
Qualitative Methods and Approaches
USAID Contribution
Screencast: Complexity-Aware Monitoring Discussion Note
USAID Contribution
New Directions in Local Capacity Development
USAID Contribution
Before you launch an online working group, it’s important to spend some time considering whether an online space is the right tool for your members and how it will help your group achieve its goals. This document walks group facilitators through a series of questions to help assess whether an online space is a good fit...
USAID Contribution
USAID's Evaluation Interest Group Resources
USAID Contribution

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