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Tips and excerpted examples that show how solicitations can better invite programming that aims to think and work politically, or be context-driven
Community Contribution
Tips to make designs more reflective of power dynamics and incentives
Community Contribution
Co-Creation Discussion Note
USAID Contribution
This policy update is the work of USAID’s Bureau for Policy, Planning and Learning’s Office of Learning, Evaluation and Research (PPL/LER). This update had been made to ensure consistency with revisions to USAID’s Automated Directives System (ADS) Chapter 201 Program Cycle Operational Policy,...
USAID Contribution
USAID is committed to full and active disclosure of evaluation reports, methods, findings, and data produced by the Agency or partners receiving USAID funding. This is guided by Agency policies and directives, including the USAID ADS Reference 201mae and ADS 540 – Development Experience Information. These direct that...
USAID Contribution
This bulletin from the Office of Acquisitions and Assistance provides guidance on how to allow for learning, flexibility, and adaptability in contracts.
USAID Contribution
This paper provides an overview of the facilitation approach with information drawn from its use in market systems development.
USAID Contribution
this new innovative methodology is being employed to evaluate program interventions, using case examples from USAID, the German Development Bank, and the World Bank.
USAID Contribution
The DUNS/SAM screencasts are designed to help USAID staff and its current and future partners better understand the steps required to register with the federally-mandated DUNS and SAM systems.
USAID Contribution
Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution

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