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A four step tool for managing the systematic transfer organizational knowledge
Community Contribution
Techniques for achieving results and tracking progress in the fluid and rapidly changing operating environment of authoritarian-ruled Belarus.
Community Contribution
Successful collaboration requires a facilitative leader. Facilitative leadership, if executed well, can increase effectiveness by harnessing the resources of many, can increase efficiency by avoiding duplication and conflict, and can be a powerful leveraging mechanism to achieve high level development goals.
Community Contribution
The new FAA 118/119 Tropical Forest and Biodiversity Analysis Best Practices Guide provides practical "how-to" advice for USAID staff and contractors conducting the analysis.
Community Contribution
This resource describes how to prepare and maintain an Activity Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning Plan.
USAID Contribution
This document establishes clear expectations for evaluation reports during the preparation of evaluation statements of work and the in-briefing of the evaluation team. These practices also serve as a guide for reviewing the quality of draft evaluation reports submitted by the evaluation team.This resource was updated in...
USAID Contribution
This How-To Note addresses key issues for USAID staff who are developing a Statement of Work for an externally contracted evaluation. Following these practices will help to establish clear expectations and requirements for the evaluation team and clearly communicate what evaluation questions will provide answers...
USAID Contribution
This paper provides an overview of the facilitation approach with information drawn from its use in market systems development.
USAID Contribution
this new innovative methodology is being employed to evaluate program interventions, using case examples from USAID, the German Development Bank, and the World Bank.
USAID Contribution
Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution

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