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Practitioners working in nutrition must start thinking about the effect food, health, and education systems have on nutrition practices and outcomes. “Systems thinking” means paying attention to the unpredictable interactions among actors, sectors, disciplines, and determinants of nutrition. That thinking results in new ways of approaching, analyzing, and solving challenges, which must be applied through policy development, program design, implementation, and research. SPRING approaches systems in two ways – by articulating and promoting systems thinking for nutrition and by strengthening specific components of those systems. This paper makes the case for why systems thinking is important for nutrition and proposes several approaches to strengthening systems for nutrition.
Community Contribution
A core goal is to support Missions in identifying opportunities to integrate alliance building more effectively into their strategy and program-design process.
USAID Contribution
The Organizational Capacity Assessment Tool (OCAT) will allow program officers, working in close collaboration with each to identify current organizational strengths and weaknesses and establish a plan for improvement that includes mechanisms to measure change.
USAID Contribution
This website offers information on the positive deviance approach.
Community Contribution
This compendium of knowledge solutions is a handy, quick reference guide to tools, methods, and approaches.
Community Contribution